Blogging the Bible

July 8, 2008 at 8:27 pm (Atheism, Big Bang, Blasphemy, Briffa, Homeopathy, Nutritionism, Patrick Holford, Trivial, Woo) (, , , , , , , , , )

Genesis, Chapter 1; Verses 1, 3 and 4.

1.1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
1.3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
1.4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

Firstly – God created the heaven and earth before he created light? Bloomin’ show-off. Somebody should have told him nobody likes a smart-arse. I mean, it wasn’t enough to create the heaven and the earth – he had to do it in the dark. [Hm, actually that gives me an idea for a bumper sticker.] I haven’t figured out how God split the light from the darkness, but I’m going to email the Pope if I can find his address. Apparently he’s infallible, so his answer must be reliable.

Secondly – God created the light and saw “that it was good”? Sounds like pride to me. Which just happens to be one of the seven deadly sins. What’s all that about? If the seven sins are that bad, how come God gets to break them? Still, nobody’s perfect.

And there’s more. Actually, hang on. This is a bit boring really. Isn’t it? Taking the piss out of a 2,000-year-old book that only a few readers actually take as being meant literally, a book that is basically some rather nice bits of poetry and short stories mixed in with a few rules that perhaps made sense to people 2,000 years ago in the Middle-East and some really basic moral rules like “don’t murder people” (and some rules that may have been born of common-sense but probably aren’t all that useful now, though I don’t know enough about 2,000-year-old eating habits so probably shouldn’t comment on the erstwhile usefulness of the Bible’s dietary rules). A book that has just prompted me to write a stupidly long sentence. And a book that has been covered with far more humour by the likes of Ricky Gervais and Bill Hicks than by me. The question is – is there still a point in remarking on the inconsistencies in the Bible. Another question might be – is it still funny to take the piss out of the Bible? Is it as funny as taking the piss out of the Organon. At least that’s only a 200-year-old book of fiction, so it’s more modern than the Bible if nothing else. And the funny dietary advice (restrictions, mostly) in the bible? No dafter that the supposedly scientific dietary advice of Visiting Professors, Medical Doctors and PhD Doctors. Heh, the holy trinity of nutritionism = Holford, McKeith and Briffa. Is it worth blogging about religion on sites like mine unless it is a case of a religion or spokesperson for a religion saying something ridiculous and/or harmful amd that has at least some import (e.g., Frankenstein-type comments from Chimera Fearers pre- the embryo research bill)?

6 Comments

  1. Martin said,

    Off Topic, but I’ve just published a follow-up to your BBC/JABS posts on LayScience

  2. Radioactive afikomen said,

    God created the light and saw “that it was good”? Sounds like pride to me. Which just happens to be one of the seven deadly sins. What’s all that about? If the seven sins are that bad, how come God gets to break them?

    Ah, but God is infallible. Therefore he gets carte blanche to commit however many sins he wants.

  3. Jess said,

    The Seven Deadly Sins were written in the 4th century by a monk Evagrius Ponticus, who last time I checked, wasn’t actually a god. So to mention that in the context of Genesis is kind of stupid.

  4. jdc325 said,

    Thanks for the comment Jess. It’s not strictly accurate to state that the seven deadly sins were written by Evagrius Ponticus, but I take your point (he is believed to have refined rather than originated the seven deadly sins; he referred to them as eight evil thoughts; and Pope Gregory I further refined them into seven deadly sins – merging pride and vainglory into one sin, merging discouragement and sorrow into sloth, and adding envy to the list).
    The thing is, so much of what Christians believe is contradictory that God often comes across as something of a hypocrite. I guess that’s inevitable if we choose to rely on the disparate writings of fallible humans that have been gathered unsystematically.

  5. Gonzo said,

    Vainglory?
    What a great word! It’s the first time I’m reading it.
    (Ford bless my online dictionary)
    And good to stumble over an older post of yours.
    Blasphemy might be getting a bit old, but it’s always worth it for a bit of comic relief.
    :D

  6. jdc325 said,

    “Blasphemy might be getting a bit old, but it’s always worth it for a bit of comic relief.”
    And it has the benefit of being a victimless crime. Cheers!

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