Patrick Holford On Cancer

January 18, 2015 at 7:43 pm (Nutritionism, Patrick Holford) (, , , )

Remember Patrick Holford? Well, he’s still going. Here is the latest post on his blog. There are some interesting comments on lifetime risk of cancer and on five- and ten-year survival rates. Let’s start with Cancer Research UK though. Read the rest of this entry »

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Risks of CAM Part One: Nocebo

August 25, 2010 at 6:30 pm (Alternative Medicine, Chiropractic, Nutritionism, Patrick Holford, Placebo) (, , , , , , , )

Risk of adverse effects from (mis)information

As well as relying on the placebo effect when making claims of the efficacy of their therapies, those providing alternative treatments may also be aided by something akin to the nocebo effect. If you tell healthy people they are sick (or sick people that they are sicker than they thought), it may be possible to induce the perception of symptoms that you can later claim to have resolved. Read the rest of this entry »

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Patrick Holford On Cell Studies and Antioxidants

August 19, 2010 at 8:50 pm (Nutritionism, Patrick Holford)

Here, Patrick Holford responds to a study that found “antioxidants suppressed DNA damage at low concentrations, but potentiated such damage at higher concentrations”. Read the rest of this entry »

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Vitamin B For Depression

June 11, 2010 at 8:09 pm (Nutritionism, Patrick Holford, Supplements) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

vitamin B for depressionYou can find lots of websites recommending B vitamins for depression, some offering high strength vitamin B supplements for lifting “mood naturally” – like this website, which sells vitamin B6 along with a claim that it can help to relieve premenstrual symptoms and depression. Read the rest of this entry »

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The BMJ: Rabid Responses and Competing Interests

May 29, 2010 at 2:07 pm (Anti-Vaccination, Conspiracy, Nutritionism, Patrick Holford, Supplements) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

A recent article in the BMJ attracted comment from the drearily ubiquitous John Stone (known to some as “the Pope of Jabs”). This comment on competing interests reminded me of Patrick Holford’s foray into the rabid responses section. Read the rest of this entry »

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Boosting Your Serotonin or Exploiting Your Depression?

February 1, 2010 at 9:11 pm (Bad Science, Big Pharma, Homeopathy, Patrick Holford) (, , , , , , , , )

What do Big Pharma, Patrick Holford, and Homeopaths all have in common? Well, apart from any other similarities, they all claim to be able to “boost your serotonin”, “remedy your neurotransmitter imbalance”, or help you to “overcome depression.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Are Multivitamin Users Younger?

June 20, 2009 at 8:30 pm (Nutritionism, Patrick Holford) (, , , , , , , )

Patrick Holford thinks so. Let’s see what evidence he uses as the basis for this assertion. Read the rest of this entry »

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Deflecting Criticism: The Well-Meaning Defence

June 19, 2009 at 10:01 pm (Miscellaneous, Patrick Holford) (, , )

I’ve noticed that, on occasion, criticism of the views, policies, or recommendations of individuals or organisations elicits the response that the individual or group being criticised is “well-meaning”, “sensitive” or “nice”, or even “sincere” and the suggestion that perhaps they should not be the subject of criticism. Read the rest of this entry »

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Targets: Aids, Cancer, Autism and Dyslexia

April 23, 2009 at 9:59 pm (Bad Science, Conspiracy, Dangerously Wrong, Homeopathy, Nutritionism, Patrick Holford) (, , , , , , , , , , )

Some fields seem to attract quackery. Energy production is an obvious one (I predict that the idea of perpetual motion machines will never die – the idea is too attractive and there will probably always be sufficiently gullible/ignorant people in the world), but there are certain fields which seem to attract medical quackery more than others. I thought I’d list a few of the apparent similarities between some of the areas that I see as attracting quackery or, at best, dubious claims. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Promotion of Counterknowledge

March 24, 2009 at 6:09 pm (Alternative Medicine, Anti-Vaccination, Bad Science, Bloggers, Briffa, Conspiracy, Dangerously Wrong, government, Media, Nutritionism, Patrick Holford, Religion, Supplements, Woo) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

[BPSDB] Those promoting Counterknowledge are winning. Possibly because the public actually don’t really care that much*. (Damien Thompson’s book Counterknowledge is available from local libraries in my area, yet I am the first person in the 14 months since it has been in the library catalogue to borrow it.) It is also possible that Counterknowledge is spreading at least partly because people with a measure of influence in society are among those who promote it. Members of the British royal family, politicians, the mainstream media, celebrities, Alternative Medicine practitioners posing as authority figures, members of churches, and even universities have helped to promote Counterknowledge. Not to mention maverick scientists such as Andrew Wakefield. Those with less authority are playing an important part too, though. For example, full-time conspiracy theorists such as the owner of the whale.to website are disseminating bullshit that is reproduced on forums such as What Doctors Don’t Tell You, or JABS. Read the rest of this entry »

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